Sample of SAT Questions

Math Practice Questions

  1. Among the following options, which choice has the most applicable detail?

 

  • A) No Change
  • B) supplement and convert it into gas to use as fuel in electricity production
  • C) supplement, while sweet whey is more desirable as a food additive for humans
  • D) supplement, which provides an important element of their diet.

 

  1. The writer is considering removing the below-mentioned sentences, do you think the writer should do this?

 

  • A) Yes, because it does not provide a transition from the previous paragraph.
  • B) Yes, because it fails to support the main argument of the passage as introduced in the first paragraph.
  • C) No, because it continues the explanation of how acid whey can be disposed of safely.
  • C) No, because it continues the explanation of how acid whey can be disposed of safely.

 

  1. For example, y is equal to Kx, k is constant and y is equal to 24. When X is equal to 6. What would be the value of Y when x is equal to 5?

 

  • A) 6
  • B) 15
  • C) 20
  • D) 20

 

  1. What would be the value of 8x when 16 + 4x is 10 more than 14?

 

  • A) 2
  • B) 6
  • C) 16
  • D) 80

 

  1. Which among the following air temperatures would be the speed of the closest sound wave to 1000 feet per second?

 

  • A) −46°F
  • B) −48°F
  • C) −49°F
  • D) −50°F

 

  1. Among the following statements, What indicates the relationship between h and C?

 

  • A) C h
  • B) C=¾ h+5
  • C) C=3h+5
  • D) h= 3C

 

  1. When 5 times the number x  is added to 10, the result is 35. What is the result when 3 times x  is added to 6?

 

  • 10
  • 15
  • 21
  • 25

 

Writing Practice Question 

 

1) “Write an essay in which you explain how Jimmy Carter builds an argument to persuade his audience that the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge should not be developed for industry.”

2) “Write an essay in which you explain how Martin Luther King Jr. builds an argument to persuade his audience that American involvement in the Vietnam War is unjust.”

3) “Write an essay in which you explain how Eliana Dockterman builds an argument to persuade her audience that there are benefits to early exposure to technology.”

4) “Write an essay in which you explain how Paul Bogard builds an argument to persuade his audience that natural darkness should be preserved.”

5) “Write an essay in which you explain how Eric Klinenberg builds an argument to persuade his audience that Americans need to greatly reduce their reliance on air-conditioning.”

6) “Write an essay in which you explain how Christopher Hitchens builds an argument to persuade his audience that the original Parthenon sculptures should be returned to Greece.”

7) “Write an essay in which you explain how Zadie Smith builds an argument to persuade her audience that public libraries are important and should remain open”

8) “Write an essay in which you explain how Bobby Braun builds an argument to persuade his audience that the US government must continue to invest in NASA.”

9) “Write an essay in which you explain how Richard Schiffman builds an argument to persuade his audience that Americans need to work fewer hours.”

10) “Write an essay in which you explain how Todd Davidson builds an argument to persuade his audience that the US government must continue to fund national parks.”

 

Evidence- Reading Practice Question



Questions 1-3 are based on the following passage.  

This passage is excerpted from the 1854 book Walden by Henry David Thoreau, which details Thoreau’s experience living in a cabin alone for two years.

I think that I love society as much as most, and am ready enough to fasten myself like a bloodsucker for the time to any full-blooded man that comes in my way. I am naturally no hermit, (5) but might possibly sit out the sturdiest frequenter for the bar-room, if my business called me thither.

I had three chairs in my house; one for solitude, two for friendship, three for society. When visitors come in larger and unexpected (10) numbers there was but the third chair for them all, but they generally economized the room by standing up. It is surprising how many great men and women a small house will contain. I have had twenty-five or thirty souls, with their bodies, (15) at once under my roof, and yet we often parted without being aware that we had come very near to one another.

One inconvenience I sometimes experienced in so small a house, the difficulty of getting to a (20) sufficient distance from my guest when we began to utter the big thoughts in big words. You want room for your thoughts to get into sailing trim and run a course or two before they make their port. The bullet of your thought must have (25) overcome its lateral and ricochet motion and fallen into its last and steady course before it reaches the ear of the hearer, else it may plow out again through the side of his head. Also our sentences wanted room to unfold and form (30) their columns in the interval. Individuals, like nations, must have suitable broad and natural boundaries, even a considerable neutral ground, between them. I have found it a singular luxury to talk across the pond to a companion on the (35) opposite side. In my house we were so near that we could not begin to hear—we could not speak low enough to be heard; as when you throw two stones into calm water so near that they break each other’s undulations. As the conversation (40) began to assume a loftier and grander tone, we gradually shoved our chairs farther apart till they touched the wall in opposite corners and then commonly there was not room enough.

My “best” room, however, my withdrawing (45) room, always ready for company, on whose carpet the sun rarely fell, was the pine wood behind my house. Thither in summer days, when distinguished guests came, I took them, and a priceless domestic swept the floor and dusted the (50) furniture and kept the things in order.

If one guest came he sometimes partook of my frugal meal, and it was no interruption to conversation to be stirring a hasty-pudding or watching the rising and maturing of a loaf of (55) bread in the ashes, in the meanwhile. But if twenty came and sat in my house there was nothing said about dinner, though there might be bread enough for two, more than if eating were a forsaken habit; but we naturally practised (60) abstinence; and this was never felt to be an offence against hospitality, but the most proper and considerate course. The waste and decay of physical life, which so often needs repair, seemed miraculously retarded in such a case, and the vital (65) vigor stood its ground. I could entertain thus a thousand as well as twenty; and if any ever went away disappointed or hungry from my house when they found me at home, they may depend upon it that I sympathized with them at least. So (70) easy it is, though many housekeepers doubt it, to establish new and better customs in the place of the old. You need not rest your reputation on the dinners you give.

As for men, they will hardly fail one (75) anywhere. I had more visitors while I lived in the woods than at any other period in my life; I mean that I had some. I met several there under more favorable circumstances than I could anywhere else. But fewer came to see me on trivial business. (80) In this respect, my company was winnowed by my mere distance from town. I had withdrawn so far within the great ocean of solitude, into which the rivers of society empty, that for the most part, so far as my needs were concerned, only the finest (85) sediment was deposited around me.

 

  1. The main narrative point of view in the passage is of

 

(A) a man adjusting to life in a big city after growing up on a farm.

(B) a discussion of visitors to a small house away from city life.

(C) a sailor discussing the pond on which he grew up and how it affected his friendships.

(D) a man discussing the potential of big thoughts and their need to be expressed.

 

  1. In the context of the passage, the phrase “as when you throw two stones into calm water so near they break each other’s undulations,” (lines 37–39) is best described as

 

(A) a reference to the author’s childhood days when he threw stones into a lake.

(B) an analogy used to elaborate on a previous statement.

(C) a way to expand on the reasons national boundaries are always changing.

(D) a reason that the author and his companion had to continually move their chairs to be heard.



  1. As used in line 27, “plow” most nearly means

 

(A) push.

(B) furrow.

(C) cultivate.

(D) walk.